Bye-Bye Soda Pop: My First Step in Balancing My Blood Sugar


I had all the classic signs of a blood sugar imbalance (a.k.a. dysglycemia). Major irritability and shakiness with missed meals, alternating sluggishness with bouts of hyperactivity, moodiness, headaches, and on, and on. At the time, I didn’t realize that this was all related to sugar. I thought it meant I wasn’t eating enough protein or that something else was going on that I couldn’t figure out. Although I admitted to having a sweet tooth, I never thought I was eating too much sugar (as most sugar junkies would say). That all changed when I started my journey of cutting refined sugar from my diet. And the effects amazed me.

Before I started this journey, I recall times when I’d be out shopping with my sister and I’d get into a panic if I didn’t have something to eat right at that moment. This would scare my sister. She’d see me shaking and scramble to find something to give me to eat. Afterward, we’d sort of laugh it off saying that’s the way I am. I couldn’t (or subconsciously wouldn’t) make the connection between what I was eating/drinking and how I was feeling. For years I consumed sugary foods and drinks. This was an ingrained habit for me.

"She'd see me shaking and scramble to find something to give me to eat."

Then came the weight gain. I packed on some extra pounds and decided I need to start working it off by doing more exercise. I started a walking routine that helped. Then a clear-as-a-bell thought dawned on me while I was walking through the park. I need to cut sugar now or I will soon become diabetic. This thought shocked me. I was relatively young and seemingly invincible. I could burn-off anything I consumed – couldn’t I?

This overwhelmed me, but I became determined to figure out what to do and how to get back on the path to health. This triggered my grand experiment on how to balance blood sugar levels. Giving up sugar cold turkey seemed impossible, so I began with cutting sugary beverages. I used to have Coca-Cola and ginger ale on a daily basis, along with iced tea in a can and orange drinks. I figured if I’m going to reduce my sugar intake might as well limit it to food instead of wasting it on liquid sugar. Diet pop wasn’t an option for me because I didn’t like the taste. Also, I wasn’t keen on the artificial sweetener part either. I later learned that artificial sweeteners can trigger sugar cravings and actually lead to weight gain).

"Giving up sugar cold turkey seemed impossible, so I began with cutting sugary beverages...I figured if I’m going to reduce my sugar intake might as well limit it to food instead of wasting it on liquid sugar."

Soon afterward, I noticed positive changes to my health by cutting soda pop and canned juice. I lost a few pounds, was a bit less cranky, and started feeling better than before. There was still a long way to go, but this first step motivated me to continue experimenting with other changes I could make. Every effort counted so that I could get off of the blood sugar roller coaster once and for all.

"This first step motivated me to continue experimenting with other diet and lifestyle changes I could make to get off of the blood sugar roller coaster once and for all."

If you have questions about how to get off of the blood sugar roller coaster, I'd be happy to help. Send me an email at info@holisticmilka.com. You can achieve long-term success to the point where you won’t crave sugar anymore – it’s true!

And share your comments about this post below too :).

#junkfood #diabetes #sugar

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